EXT. PARK – AFTERNOON

LILITH, a vision of innocence and darkness, 22 in appearance, strolls through the park. Lilith smiles at a mother and her daughter playfully walking past her. She approaches an ANDROID in a jumpsuit, picking up garbage from the ground. It looks up at her, and she meets his gaze. An uncanny vision. Lilith is taken aback. Unaffected, expressionless, the Android steps out of her way and continues his task. Lilith watches it, disturbed. Hesitantly, she continues her walk. Still on the edge, she looks at the natural world around her. Her worries slip away.

Her gaze is that of desire and wonder. She places her hand on the bark of a tree and traces its surface. The afternoon sun shines down on her through the tree’s branches and leaves, and she stares directly into it — a challenge and a plea for attention. She closes her eyes. The sounds of SWAYING BRANCHES, of birds CHIRPING, of the wind HOWLING intensify. It’s like a dream, but the dissatisfaction coming over her face expresses her inability to really grasp it.

She’s awoken by the intrusive sounds of cars HONKING. She walks to the entrance of the park and stares out into the chaos of the city. Metal. Concrete. Screens. An industrial whirlwind.

Lilith stands at the entrance, a bridge between worlds. Her feet brush the concrete of the sidewalk, and she steps forward.

INT. AUTO REPAIR SHOP – DAY

ADAM REED, 33, a transgender man with a soft face that holds the potential for openness and kindness, but serves only as a beautiful shield for an armored, hard soul. His body is largely made up of cybernetic limbs. He works on a car, focused. Others work around him. MENAHEM, 64, the lovable Israeli owner of the shop who likes to project the sternness everyone is aware he doesn’t have, walks in. He calls for Adam in his thick accent.

MENAHEM
Adam. Outside. Is for you.

EXT. AUTO REPAIR SHOP

Adam walks out, wiping his hands on a towel. He sees a black car parked. Leaning on its hood, JOHN, 50s, waits for him. John stands upon seeing Adam.


CONTINUED: 2


ADAM
(frustrated)
Fuck.

EXT. GEORGE REED’S HOUSE – DAY

The car pulls up on the long driveway of the large house. John goes to open the door for Adam, but Adam lets himself out of the car on his own. Adam stares up at the house with disdain and intimidation before walking up to the door.

INT. GEORGE REED’S HOUSE – GEORGE’S OFFICE

From behind his desk, GEORGE REED, 53, an aloof, calculating, and selectively passionate cyberneticist, pours whiskey into two glasses. He sits in a wheelchair, one of his legs lost and the other out of commission.

Adam stares around the room at the various awards, framed articles about George’s company, photos, artwork, and displays of wealth. Adam doesn’t look with admiration, but with boredom. Adam’s eyes eventually fall on a door behind George’s desk. The door interests him – it’s been broken from the inside. It is then that Adam notices the shards of glass on the floor from a broken window. He looks at George, suspicious.

ADAM
You’re a little old for these parties.

George ignores this.

GEORGE
I need your help.

ADAM
Yeah?

George passes a glass of whiskey to Adam. Adam takes it.

GEORGE
Well, it doesn’t know what you look like. For this thing, you need the element of surprise.

 

ADAM
What thing?

George turns to the door behind him. He opens it and gestures for Adam to follow.


CONTINUED: 3


INT. LAB

Adam enters the small lab through the door. There’s a large monitor on the wall. The lab is trashed.

GEORGE
I had designed a synthezoid from a system I worked on with Roland before he died. He didn’t know. No one does. Just me. And now you.

 

ADAM
And?

It clicks.

ADAM (cont’d)
It got out.

GEORGE
That’s why I need you, son.

George rolls back into his office. Adam follows.

INT. GEORGE’S OFFICE

ADAM
Me? What the hell am I supposed to do?

GEORGE
It has a tracker on the buck of its neck.

George pulls out an earpiece with a single glass lens attached. He gives it to Adam.

GEORGE (cont’d)

I can track it from here and send you the coordinates on this lens. This communicator isn’t monitored, so use it when contacting me. When you’ve located it, tell me; and I’ll freeze its system. It isn’t permanent, so you’ll have to bring it back to me quickly. That is if you decide to do this for me.

Adam only glares at his father with resentment and confusion. George looks back, oblivious to his son’s expression.


CONTINUED: 4


ADAM
Dad…You can’t decide that I’m suddenly useful to you and–

GEORGE
I’ll pay you.

Adam pauses.

ADAM
I don’t want your money.

George pauses. His mind is working. He rolls his chair over to Adam and holds his arm in what’s an attempt at warmth.

GEORGE
You’re the only person I trust to do this. You’re my son.

Adam pauses at this.

GEORGE (CONT’D)
But it’s your choice. You don’t have to. John will drive you back to work.

George opens the office door and holds it for Adam to leave. Adam looks at George, uncertain. He swallows his glass of whiskey with intense gulps and places it down firmly on the desk. He walks out the office door, barely looking at George when he passes him.

GEORGE
Send my regards to your mother.

Adam turns and gives him a heated gaze. George doesn’t break his gaze until Adam is out of sight. He closes the door.

INT. HOSPITAL – EVENING

Adam walks down the hall carrying flowers. He nods at nurses and doctors in greeting when they pass him. He steps into a room.

INT. PATIENT’S ROOM – EVENING

In the bed is his mother, SHARON REED, 54. She’s in a coma. Adam places the flowers on her bedside table, next to a vase of wilting flowers. He looks at her with deep pain and love. He sits down and takes her hand in his.


CONTINUED: 5


A NURSE, 54, petite and a little heavyset, walks in. DOCTOR AMANDA JONES, 47, earnest and tough, stands by the door. The Nurse places her hand on Adam’s shoulder to grab his attention. He turns to her. He sees Doctor Jones and nods. He turns to look back at his mother, then goes to the doctor.

Adam and Doctor Jones speak from the door. The Nurse checks on Sharon. The HEART MONITOR’s BEEPS drown out the whispered conversation. Adam is distraught at what Doctor Jones is telling him. His reaction bounces from sadness to anger. The monitor keeps beeping, turning into–

EXT. CITY STREET – EVENING

HONKING. There’s traffic. Lilith walks in the shadows on the sidewalk. A large digital screen used for advertising catches Lilith’s attention. On the screen, a woman models a product. The superficiality of it is the alluring part. The model’s vapid smile and blank eyes grow more and more uncomfortable to look at. Lilith grows slightly distressed.

A laughing group of YOUNG WOMEN draws her attention away. They’re carefree, lively, and raw. She watches as they lineup to enter a club. The BOUNCER points his scanner at each of them as an ID check. GREEN lasers cover each of them. On the scanner’s screen the Bouncer gets all of their information. He nods at them. They disappear inside.

Lilith follows.

EXT. CLUB ENTRANCE

Lilith stands behind two men as they get ID’d. It’s her turn. She awkwardly steps forward. The Bouncer points his scanner at her. GREEN lasers cover her face.

The scanner gets messed up. The Bouncer slaps it a few times.

BOUNCER
Otra vez. Piece of shit. This shit was supposed to make things easier. Look at this shit. Just fuckin’ go in. I don’t even care.

The Bouncer opens the door for her.


CONTINUED: 6


INT. CLUB

Lilith walks into the dimly lit club. Multi-colored lights bounce around the place.

BOUNCER(OS)
Let them fuckin’ fire me. I don’t give a fuck. Yeah, ya’ll, too. Just go the fuck in.

The Bouncer is drowned out by the loud MUSIC. As Lilith moves through the crowd, everything seems to slow down. She’s consumed by the loss of civility; by the joyous regression into base desires. People move around her, twisting, writhing, pressed against each other. It’s hypnotizing, disturbing, alluring, and maddening. It’s a beautiful nightmare. She notices that some of the dancers have cybernetic enhancements.

Lilith manages to escape the crowd and walk to the bar. She balances herself on the counter and looks back, in need, like someone who felt disturbed by their first drug trip, yet yearns for the experience again. She’s noticed by JAY SANTOS, 23,a wide-eyed, but directionless young woman. Jay takes a sip of her drink as she checks out Lilith. A beat as she decides what to do.

JAY
Hey.

Lilith turns to her. A pause.

LILITH
Hello.

JAY
Jay. You?

LILITH
Your name is Jay?

Jay pauses. Laughs.

JAY
Yeah, sorry. What’s your name?

LILITH
Lilith.

JAY
Lilith. I like that. Can I get you a drink?

Lilith pauses. She looks at Jay’s glass.


CONTINUED: 7


LILITH
What are you drinking?

JAY
Oh, I’m not even sure. I let my friend order for me.

LILITH
It’s liquor? Could I try it?

JAY
You…want to take a sip of my drink?

LILITH
Yes. Is that weird?

JAY
Uh, no. I guess not.

Jay slides her drink over. Lilith takes a small sip and makes a sour face. Jay laughs.

JAY (cont’d)
You don’t drink much, huh?

LILITH
I think I’ll just have water, please.

Lilith slides the glass back to Jay.

Jay calls the bartender.

JAY
Water. Thanks.

Jay turns back to Lilith.

JAY (cont’d)
So where you from?

A pause.

LILITH
From the area, I suppose. You?

JAY
Yeah, me too.

The bartender places the glass of water in front of Jay. She slides it to Lilith.


CONTINUED: 8


JAY (cont’d)
There you are.

Lilith takes a sip.

LILITH
Thank you.

JAY
It’s cool.

Lilith turns to look back at the dancers. Jay follows her gaze.

JAY (cont’d)
Would you like to dance?

Lilith turns to look at Jay. Trepidation. She looks back at the dancers and finds the inspiration to do it. She turns back to Jay.

LILITH
Yes. I would.

Jay takes the last sip from her cup and gestures for Lilith to lead the way. They slide through the dancers until they find space towards the middle. It’s a slower song that’s playing. Lilith and Jay are both awkward and unsure of how to initiate the dancing. Both laugh and smile to try and hide their embarrassment and uncertainty. Lilith then takes the initiative. She guides Jay’s hands to her waist, and they start dancing.

JAY
So…what do you do for a living?

LILITH
I think I’m still trying to figure that out.

Jay laughs.

JAY
I feel that.

LILITH
What about you?

JAY
I’m in school right now. Second year. Took me a while to decide what I wanted to do.


CONTINUED: 9


LILITH
What did you decide?

Jay pauses. Her expression is slightly strained. She doesn’t want to talk about this.

JAY
I guess I decided to do what my dad wanted me to do.

Lilith’s face turns hard, but genuine.

LILITH
But what about you?

JAY
I don’t know. I just never figured it out.

LILITH
Why?

JAY
You ask a lot of questions.

LILITH
Does it bother you?

JAY
No, no. It’s nice.

They smile at each other.

LILITH
Jay.

 

Lilith looks at the other dancers enjoying themselves.

LILITH (CONT’D)
Why can’t this be what you do for a living? Why can’t you just choose to enjoy yourself?

JAY
I wish.

 

Diego Armando Duran’s script Lillith won third prize in the Sixth Annual School of Visual Arts Writing Program Contest. Diego’s short story “Pride of the Sun: A Fairy Tale” won third prize in the Fifth Annual School of Visual Arts Writing Program Contest. He is a writer and artist graduating in May of 2018 with a BFA in Animation from SVA.